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Arab Linguistic Imperialism and the Decline of Arabic: Does anyone speak Arabic? Part 2

13 Jun
in Arabic language. The book was written by th...

in Arabic language. The book was written by the end of 16th century (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This second part of the post is much more provoking and may anger some readers because of the analysis Franck makes as to why the Arabic language is in the situation it finds itself in today. But like any researcher he has to explore all the possible reasons and possible “solutions” to the problem and do so in a constructive manner. The Arabic language has a unique, complex and complicated linguistic situation wherever it exists as a “native language”; and because of this, in the postcolonial globalized era the language loss/shift debate is further complicated. I hope you enjoy this as much as I did and that it gets the minds of sociolinguists or those interested in Arabic to think on a much deeper less defensive level about the way in which we use Arabic today.—–start

Foreign imposition or self affliction?

Playing into the hands of keepers of the Arab nationalist canon—as well as Arabists and lobbyists working on behalf of the Arabic language today—the AP article adopted the cliché that the decline of Arabic—like the failure of Arab nationalism—was the outcome of Western linguistic intrusions and the insidious, colonialist impulses of globalization. “Many Lebanese pride themselves on being fluent in French—a legacy of French colonial rule,” Karam wrote, rendering a mere quarter-century of French mandatory presence in Lebanon (1920-46) into a period of classical-style “French colonial rule” that had allegedly destroyed the foundations of the Arabic language in the country and turned the Lebanese subalterns into imitative Francophones denuded of their putative Arab personality.[18] Alas, this fashionable fad fails to take into account that French colonialism in its Lebanese context differed markedly from France’s colonial experience elsewhere. For one, the founding fathers of modern Lebanon lobbied vigorously for turning their post-Ottoman mountain Sanjak into a French protectorate after World War I.[19] And with regard to the Lebanese allegedly privileging the French language, that too, according to Selim Abou, seems to have hardly been a colonialist throwback and an outcome of early twentieth-century French imperialism. In his 1962 Le binlinguisme Arabe-Français au Liban, Abou wrote that the French language (or early Latin variants of what later became French) entered Mount-Lebanon and the Eastern Mediterranean littoral at the time of the first Crusades (ca. 1099).[20] Centuries later, the establishment of the Maronite College in Rome (1584) and the liberal (pro-Christian) policies of then Mount-Lebanon’s Druze ruler, Fakhreddine II (1572-1635), allowed the Maronites to further strengthen their religious and their religion’s ancillary cultural and linguistic ties to Rome, Europe, and especially France—then, still the “elder daughter” of the Catholic Church. This unleashed a wave of missionary work to Lebanon—and wherever Eastern Christianity dared flaunt its specificity—and eventually led to the founding of schools tending to the educational needs of the Christian—namely Maronite—communities of the region. Although foundational courses in Arabic and Syriac were generally taught at those missionary schools, European languages including French, Italian, and German were also part of the regular curriculum. French, therefore, can be argued to have had an older pedigree in Lebanon than suggested by Karam. And contrary to the classical norms in the expansion and transmission of imperial languages—the spread of Arabic included—which often entailed conquests, massacres, and cultural suppression campaigns, the French language can be said to have been adopted willingly by the Lebanese through “seduction” not “subjection.”[21] It is true that many Lebanese, and Middle Easterners more generally, are today steering clear of Arabic in alarming numbers, but contrary to AP’s claim, this routing of Arabic is not mainly due to Western influence and cultural encroachments—though the West could share some of the blame; rather, it can be attributed, even if only partially, to MSA’s retrogression, difficulty, and most importantly perhaps, to the fact that this form of Arabic is largely a learned, cultic, ceremonial, and literary language, which is never acquired natively, never spoken natively, and which seems locked in an uphill struggle for relevance against sundry spontaneous, dynamic, natively-spoken, vernacular languages. Taha Hussein ascribed the decay and abnegation of the Arabic language primarily to its “inability of expressing the depths of one’s feelings in this new age.” He wrote in 1956 that MSA is difficult and grim, and the pupil who goes to school in order to study Arabic acquires only revulsion for his teacher and for the language, and employs his time in pursuit of any other occupations that would divert and soothe his thoughts away from this arduous effort … Pupils hate nothing more than they hate studying Arabic.[22]

Yet, irreverent as they had been in shunning Arabic linguistic autocracy and fostering a lively debate on MSA and multilingualism, Lebanon and Egypt and their Arabic travails are hardly uncommon in today’s Middle East. From Israel to Qatar and from Abu Dhabi to Kuwait, modern Middle Eastern nations that make use of some form of Arabic have had to come face to face with the challenges hurled at their hermetic MSA and are impelled to respond to the onslaught of impending polyglotism and linguistic humanism borne by the lures of globalization. In a recent article published in Israel’s liberal daily Ha’aretz, acclaimed Druze poet and academic Salman Masalha called on Israel’s Education Ministry to do away with the country’s public school system’s Arabic curricula and demanded its replacement with Hebrew and English course modules. Arabophone Israelis taught Arabic at school, like Arabophones throughout the Middle East, were actually taught a foreign tongue misleadingly termed Arabic, wrote Masalha

The mother tongue [that people] speak at home is totally different from the … Arabic [they learn] at school; [a situation] that perpetuates linguistic superficiality [and] leads to intellectual superficiality … It’s not by chance that not one Arab university is [ranked] among the world’s best 500 universities. This finding has nothing to do with Zionism.[23]

Masalha’s is not a lone voice. The abstruseness of Arabic and the stunted achievements of those monolingual Arabophones constrained to acquire modern knowledge by way of Modern Standard Arabic have been indicted in the United Nations’ Arab Human Development reports—a series of reports written by Arabs and for the benefit of Arabs—since the year 2002. To wit, the 2003 report noted that the Arabic language is struggling to meet the challenges of modern times[and] is facing [a] severe … and real crisis in theorization, grammar, vocabulary, usage, documentation, creativity, and criticism … The most apparent aspect of this crisis is the growing neglect of the functional aspects of [Arabic] language use. Arabic language skills in everyday life have deteriorated, and Arabic … has in effect ceased to be a spoken language. It is only the language of reading and writing; the formal language of intellectuals and academics, often used to display knowledge in lectures … [It] is not the language of cordial, spontaneous expression, emotions, daily encounters, and ordinary communication. It is not a vehicle for discovering one’s inner self or outer surroundings.[24]

And so, concluded the report, the only Arabophone countries that were able to circumvent this crisis of knowledge were those like Lebanon and Egypt, which had actively promoted a polyglot tradition, deliberately protected the teaching of foreign languages, and instated math and science curricula in languages other than Arabic. Translation is another crucial means of transmitting and acquiring knowledge claimed the U.N. report, and given that “English represents around 85 percent of the total world knowledge balance,” one might guess that “knowledge-hungry countries,” the Arab states included, would take heed of the sway of English, or at the very least, would seek out the English language as a major source of translation. Yet, from all source-languages combined, the Arab world’s 330 million people translated a meager 330 books per year; that is, “one fifth of the number [of books] translated in Greece [home to 12 million Greeks].” Indeed, from the times of the Caliph al-Ma’mun (ca. 800 CE) to the beginnings of the twenty-first century, the “Arab world” had translated a paltry 10,000 books: the equivalent of what Spain translates in a single year.[25]

But clearer heads are prevailing in Arab countries today. Indeed, some Arabs are taking ownership of their linguistic dilemmas; feckless Arab nationalist vainglory is giving way to practical responsible pursuits, and the benefits of valorizing local speech forms and integrating foreign languages into national, intellectual, and pedagogic debates are being contemplated. Arabs “are learning less Islam and more English in the tiny desert sheikhdom of Qatar” read a 2003 Washington Post article, and this overhaul of Qatar’s educational system, with its integration of English as a language of instruction—”a total earthquake” as one observer termed it—was being billed as the Persian Gulf’s gateway toward greater participation in an ever more competitive global marketplace. But many Qataris and Persian Gulf Arabs hint to more pressing and more substantive impulses behind curricular bilingualism: “necessity-driven” catalysts aimed at replacing linguistic and religious jingoism with equality, tolerance, and coexistence; changing mentalities as well as switching languages and textbooks.[26] This revolution is no less subversive in nearby Abu Dhabi where in 2009 the Ministry of Education launched a series of pedagogical reform programs aimed at integrating bilingual education into the national curriculum. Today, “some 38,000 students in 171 schools in Abu Dhabi [are] taught … simultaneously in Arabic and English.”[27] And so, rather than rushing to prop up and protect the fossilized remains of MSA, the debate that should be engaged in today’s Middle East needs to focus more candidly on the utility, functionality, and practicality of a hallowed and ponderous language such as MSA in an age of nimble, clipped, and profane speech forms. The point of reflection should not be whether to protect MSA but whether the language inherited from the Jahiliya Bedouins—to paraphrase Egypt’s Salama Musa (1887-1958)—is still an adequate tool of communication in the age of information highways and space shuttles.[28] Obviously, this is a debate that requires a healthy dose of courage, honesty, moderation, and pragmatism, away from the usual religious emotions and cultural chauvinism that have always stunted and muzzled such discussions.

Linguistic Schizophrenia and Deceit

Sherif Shubashy’s book Down with Sibawayh If Arabic Is to Live on![29] seems to have brought these qualities into the debate. An eighth-century Persian grammarian and father of Arabic philology, Sibawayh is at the root of the modern Arabs’ failures according to Shubashy. Down with Sibawayh, which provoked a whirlwind of controversy in Egypt and other Arab countries following its release in 2004, sought to shake the traditional Arabic linguistic establishment and the Arabic language itself out of their millenarian slumbers and proposed to unshackle MSA from stiff and superannuated norms that had, over the centuries, transformed it into a shrunken and fossilized mummy: a ceremonial, religious, and literary language that was never used as a speech form, and whose hallowed status “has rendered it a heavy chain curbing the Arabs’ intellect, blocking their creative energies … and relegating them to cultural bondage.”[30] In a metaphor reminiscent of Musa’s description of the Arabic language, Shubashy compared MSA users to “ambling cameleers from the past, contesting highways with racecar drivers hurtling towards modernity and progress.”[31] In his view, the Arabs’ failure to modernize was a corollary of their very language’s inability (or unwillingness) to regenerate and innovate and conform to the exigencies of modern life.[32] But perhaps the most devastating blow that Shubashy dealt the Arabic language was his description of the lahja and fusha (or dialect vs. MSA) dichotomy as “linguistic schizophrenia.”[33] For although Arabs spoke their individual countries’ specific, vernacular languages while at home, at work, on the streets, or in the marketplace, the educated among them were constrained to don a radically different linguistic personality and make use of an utterly different speech form when reading books and newspapers, watching television, listening to the radio, or drafting formal, official reports.[34] That speech form, which was never spontaneously spoken, Shubashy insisted, was Modern Standard Arabic: a language which, not unlike Latin in relation to Europe’s Romance languages, was distinct from the native, spoken vernaculars of the Middle East and was used exclusively by those who had adequate formal schooling in it. He even went so far as to note that “upward of 50 percent of so-called Arabophones can’t even be considered Arabs if only MSA is taken for the legitimate Arabic language, the sole true criterion of Arabness.” [35] Conversely, it was a grave error to presume the vernacular speech forms of the Middle East to be Arabic, even if most Middle Easterners and foreigners were conditioned, and often intimidated, into viewing them as such. The so-called dialects of Arabic were not Arabic at all, he wrote, despite the fact that

like many other Arabs, I have bathed in this linguistic schizophrenia since my very early childhood. I have for very long thought that the difference between MSA and the dialects was infinitely minimal; and that whoever knew one language—especially MSA—would intuitively know, or at the very least, understand the other. However, my own experience, and especially the evidence of foreigners studying MSA, convinced me of the deep chasm that separated MSA from dialects. Foreigners who are versed in MSA, having spent many years studying that language, are taken aback when I speak to them in the Egyptian dialect; they don’t understand a single word I say in that language.[36]

This “pathology” noted Shubashy, went almost unnoticed in past centuries when illiteracy was the norm, and literacy was still the preserve of small, restricted guilds—mainly the ulema and religious grammarians devoted to the study of Arabic and Islam, who considered their own linguistic schizophrenia a model of piety and a sacred privilege to be vaunted, not concealed. Today, however, with the spread of literacy in the Arab world, and with the numbers of users of MSA swelling and hovering in the vicinity of 50 percent, linguistic schizophrenia is becoming more widespread and acute, crippling the Arab mind and stunting its capacities. Why was it that Spaniards, Frenchmen, Americans, and many more of the world’s transparent and linguistically nimble societies, needed to use only a single, native language for both their acquisition of knowledge and grocery shopping whereas Arabs were prevented from reading and writing in the same language that they use for their daily mundane needs?[37]. As a consequence of the firestorm unleashed by his book, Shubashy, an Egyptian journalist and news anchor and, at one time, the Paris bureau-chief of the Egyptian al-Ahram news group, was forced to resign his post as Egypt’s deputy minister of culture in 2006. The book caused so much controversy to a point that the author and his work were subjected to a grueling cross-examination in the Egyptian parliament where, reportedly, scuffles erupted between supporters and opponents of Shubashy’s thesis. In the end, the book was denounced as an affront to Arabs and was ultimately banned. Shubashy himself was accused of defaming the Arabic language in rhetoric mimicking a “colonialist discourse.”[38] A deputy in the Egyptian parliament—representing Alexandria, Shubashy’s native city—accused the author of “employing the discourse and argumentation of a colonialist occupier, seeking to replace the Arab identity with [the occupier's] own identity and culture.”[39] Ahmad Fuad Pasha, advisor to the president of Cairo University, argued that the book “was added proof that, indeed, the Zionist-imperialist conspiracy is a glaring reality,”[40] aimed at dismantling Arab unity. Muhammad Ahmad Achour wrote in Egypt’s Islamic Standard that

Shubashy has taken his turn aiming another arrow at the heart of the Arabic language. Yet, the powers that seek to destroy our language have in fact another goal in mind: The ultimate aim of their conspiracy is none other than the Holy Qur’an itself, and to cause Muslims to eventually lose their identity and become submerged into the ocean of globalization.[41]

Even former Egyptian president Husni Mubarak felt compelled to take a potshot at Shubashy in a speech delivered on Laylat al-Qadr, November 9, 2004, the anniversary of the night that Sunni Muslims believe the Prophet Muhammad received his first Qur’anic revelation. Mubarak warned,I must caution the Islamic religious scholars against the calls that some are sounding for the modernization of the Islamic religion, so as to ostensibly make it evolve, under the pretext of attuning it to the dominant world order of “modernization” and “reform.” This trend has led recently to certain initiatives calling for the modification of Arabic vocabulary and grammar; the modification of God’s chosen language no less; the holy language in which he revealed his message to the Prophet.[42]

Conclusion

This then, the recognition and normalization of dialects, could have been a fitting conclusion and a worthy solution to the dilemma that Shubashy set out to resolve. Unfortunately, he chose to pledge fealty to MSA and classical Arabic—ultimately calling for their normalization and simplification rather than their outright replacement.[45] In that sense, Shubashy showed himself to be in tune with the orthodoxies preached by Husri who, as early as 1955, had already been calling for the creation of a “middle Arabic language” and a crossbreed fusing MSA and vernacular speech forms—as a way of bridging the Arabs’ linguistic incoherence and bringing unity to their fledgling nationhood:

MSA is the preserve of a small, select number of educated people, few of whom bother using it as a speech form. Conversely, what we refer to as “dialectal Arabic” is in truth a bevy of languages differing markedly from one country to the other, with vast differences often within the same country, if not within the same city and neighborhood … Needless to say, this pathology contradicts the exigencies of a sound, wholesome national life! [And given] that true nations deserving of the appellation require a single common and unifying national language … [the best solution I can foresee to our national linguistic quandary] would be to inoculate the dialectal languages with elements of MSA … so as to forge a new “middle MSA” and diffuse it to the totality of Arabs … This is our best hope, and for the time being, the best palliative until such a day when more lasting and comprehensive advances can be made towards instating the final, perfected, integral MSA.[46]

This is at best a disappointing and desultory solution, not only due to its chimerical ambitions but also because, rather than simplifying an already cluttered and complicated linguistic situation, it suggested the engineering of an additional language for the “Arab nation” to adopt as a provisional national idiom. To expand on Shubashy’s initial diagnosis, this is tantamount to remedying schizophrenia by inducing a multi-personality disorder—as if Arabs were in want of yet another artificial language to complement their already aphasiac MSA. Granted, national unification movements and the interference in, or creation of, a national language are part of the process of nation building and often do bear fruit. However, success in the building of a national language is largely dependent upon the size of the community and the proposed physical space of the nation in question.[47] In other words, size does matter. Small language unification movements—as in the cases of, say, Norway, Israel, and France—can and often do succeed. But big language unification movements on the other hand—as in the cases of pan-Turkism, pan-Slavism, pan-Germanism, and yes, pan-Arabism—have thus far been met with not only failure but also devastating wars, genocides, and mass population movements. Moreover, traditionally, the small language unification movements that did succeed in producing national languages benefitted from overwhelming, popular support among members of the proposed nation. More importantly, they sought to normalize not prestige, hermetic, (written) literary languages, but rather lower, degraded speech forms that were often already spoken natively by the national community in question (e.g., Creole in Haiti, Old Norse in Norway, and modern, as opposed to biblical Hebrew in Israel)[48] Shubashy’s call of “down with Sibawayh!” meant purely and simply “down with the classical language” and its MSA progeny. Overthrowing Sibawayh meant also deposing the greatest Arabic grammarian, the one credited with the codification, standardization, normalization, and spread of the classical Arabic language—and later its MSA descendent. Yet, calling for the dethroning of one who was arguably the founding father of modern Arabic grammar, and in the same breath demanding the preservation, inoculation, and invigoration of his creation, is contradictory and confusing. It is like “doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results,” to use Albert Einstein’s famous definition of insanity. Or could it be that perhaps an initially bold Shubashy was rendered timid by a ruthless and intimidating MSA establishment? After all, there are few Arabs doing dispassionate, critical work on MSA today, who do not ultimately end up being cowed into silence, or worse yet, slandered, discredited, and accused of Zionist perfidy and “Arabophobia.” Salama Musa, [49] Taha Hussein,[50] and Adonis [51] are the most obvious and recent examples of such character assassinations. Ultimately, however, it is society and communities of users—not advocacy groups, linguistic guilds, and preservation societies—that decide the fate of languages. As far as the status and fate of the Arabic language are concerned, the jury still seems to be out.

—-end
Wow! Ouch! Some important issues raised, I suspect that some of the points he mentioned in this second part could produce a dozen PhD thesis’ that’s no exaggeration.  The issue is that complex, it’s that multi-layered, it’s not about panicking or playing down the importance of Arabic….it’s about finding a real solution for how Arabic can be a productive language for its speakers and a language which can be used to account for new and modern discoveries. I think most Arabic speakers want Arabic to be their language of knowledge where they do not have to translate or learn a new language to understand and appreciate knowledge alongside English and other major languages. Currently it’s taken a back-seat in many spheres of world knowledge and many speakers do not feel empowered using Arabic. In my next post I will discuss naming rights and how language is an indicator of civilisation and knowledge.
Source: http://www.meforum.org/3066/does-anyone-speak-arabic
(You can also find all the footnotes there)
 

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20 responses to “Arab Linguistic Imperialism and the Decline of Arabic: Does anyone speak Arabic? Part 2

  1. Terri

    June 15, 2012 at 2:49 am

    Controversial and I suspect that most Arabic speakers will feel offended by the contents of the article….but as always you’ve made a super choice in the post and the discussion. Thanks for enlightening our ignorant minds, I think now I realise that Arabic is not like any other language and perhaps researchers need to find new ways to study this language on a sociolinguistic level….good work fellow linguist :) good luck with the PhD

     
  2. Kj

    June 16, 2012 at 2:51 pm

    I loved this post so thought provoking (not that other posts are not :)) I loved the paragraph where Franck says: “obviously this is a debate that requires a healthy dose of courage, honesty, moderation, and pragmatism away from the usual religous emotions and cultural chauvinism that have always stunted and muzzled such discussions”! Sorry I wrote the whole thing down but that one statement has stayed with me from the first day I saw the post so I felt that I had to come here and say well done for sharing this with us. We often get caught up in religious and cultural arguments for Arabic and the true picture of what is going on just never really comes to light. I hope there are more researchers like you out there working to view and solve this problem in creative ways. Can I also say anytime you are next in Beirut please let’s meet up I’d love a chat with a creative linguist like you thank you Fatma.

    Karina

     
    • FFSS

      June 18, 2012 at 8:04 am

      Thank you Karina for the kind words and stopping by, thanks for the invite to beautiful Beirut :)…..keep reading!

       
  3. Gerri

    June 16, 2012 at 2:53 pm

    Great, that is exactly what I was looking for! A balanced new way of approaching Arabic and its situation in society thanks for enlightening us

     
    • FFSS

      June 18, 2012 at 8:11 am

      Thanks I don’t think it’s so new as Franck Salama has discussed this in depth in other places but it’s definitely a direction that we researchers need to take if we are seriously going to understand the situation of Arabic. Thanks for stopping by.

       
  4. L

    June 18, 2012 at 5:34 pm

    This piece reads more like a party-line editorial than an effort to reach the truth. The author generalises from Maronites to Lebanese as a whole, and from Lebanese to Arabs as a whole (ironically, given that he doesn’t see Lebanese, or most Arabic speakers, as Arabs to begin with). It is amazing to see an article ostensibly about Arabic in general devoting paragraphs to the positive experience of one minority group in one small country with French, while entirely ignoring the case of Algeria, the second most populous Arabic-speaking country, where French colonialism crippled Arabic education, leaving literacy rates lower in 1962 than they had been in 1830. Similarly, he shifts insensibly between two very different questions – the use of foreign languages within the Arab world, and the use of MSA – trusting the reader not to notice that he nowhere establishes a logical link between his defence of the former and his condemnation of the latter, and ignoring the basic socieconomic factors at play in the tension between the two. Like it or not, the average man on the street in most Arab countries is far better able to use Arabic, even including Classical/Modern Standard, than to use French or English, and the continued use of foreign languages by the elite is, among other things, a way to exclude the masses.

    Judging by this article, the writer seems to have the following order of priorities: defend French, condemn MSA, and then maybe think about offering some vague encouragement to the language that practically all of his countrymen actually speak. If they were reversed, one might be able to have some sympathy with his position.

     
    • FFSS

      June 18, 2012 at 7:50 pm

      Thanks L for stopping by, your criticism of the article is spot on and I agree that to base his findings on one country is not really reaching the truth. Of course the Algerian case is so completely different from the Lebanese one, but that’s what he is familiar with. From a sociolinguistic perspective I think he asks the right questions or at least has the right intentions but his somewhat narrow treatment of the “problem” at hand is what makes the whole article slightly disorganised. This is the current situation of the literature on the demise/death/shift/illiteracy of Arabic language in countries where it has the status as a native language. Real research on the ground needs to be done in order to understand the linguistic environments as they are in these countries. I agree and it is a known fact that the colonial languages are used by Arabic speakers to separate themselves from the masses and to create their own middle classes (whether this be French or English or in the East African case Arabic!). I think it is also important to make clear that the situation of Arabic speakers changes from one country to another, even one part of a country to another. So while the great Algerians (or Syrians or Iraqis) can speak beautiful almost flawless Arabic (MSA/Classical) some other “Arabs” cannot, and prefer to speak their spoken (informal) Arabic or the foreign language of their choice. There is a clear problem in that many Arabic students speak a different Arabic to the one they learn in classrooms across the middle east and this is what is causing anxiety and loss of confidence in using Arabic effectively (this is due to them feeling that they are unable to use and connect to the “official” or “proper” Arabic). I also agree with your point that there are socio-economic factors to take into consideration when drawing conclusions about the nature of language use and its status- clearly that is yet to be done. I think that through these types of articles and criticisms like yours we as researchers can begin to understand the real issues, ask the right questions and carry out reliable (not theoretical) research in a bid to describe the exact problem- thank you for the comment.

       
      • L

        June 19, 2012 at 2:30 pm

        Syrians or Iraqis maybe – Algerians not so flawlessly! But yes, that is the basic problem – MSA is close enough to what we actually speak to be easy to learn to understand, but far enough to be rather hard to learn to produce, which makes for very asymmetrical communication. Foreign languages are no solution to that, though; they just replace it with a much sharper divide between those who can speak it and those who can’t.

        Just realised we did the same MA, btw – nice to see you’ve continued linguistics, and good luck with your doctorate!

         
        • FFSS

          June 20, 2012 at 4:11 pm

          Yes foreign languages should not be the solution for that, but that’s what’s happening right now at least in some places. Oh so we did! Didn’t realise either, thanks and congratulations on completion of your doctorate, and your blog looks good too.

           
  5. Kes

    June 18, 2012 at 8:57 pm

    Hi I’d like to add to the current discussion that I don’t think the author’s intentions were to mislead people or that he has got all his facts wrong. I agree there are things that he could have rephrased better but that does not invalidate his points. I think all avenues need to be investigated, just because he commented on Lebanon alone does not mean he should be dismissed, I come from morocco and I could also write about the unique situation in Morocco with regards to this topic, had he generalised it to all Arab countries we would have criticised him for that,his idea was to show this schezophrenic relationship most of us Arabs have with “proper” Arabic and our spoken Arabic, and I think he did a good job. Thank you and keep the blog going.

     
  6. Emile

    June 22, 2012 at 10:17 am

    It may be controversial but it did teach me a lot, and I think the associated issues are much more complex than some linguists make it out to be…well done and please please keep blogging with greeting from France!

     
  7. Mark

    June 24, 2012 at 2:34 am

    Thanks for the enlightening article, glad to have read it here, I’ll be sharing this with my class in the fall… Cheers. Mark

     
  8. Dayna

    June 24, 2012 at 6:51 pm

    Serious issues with this whole Arabic thing, I still can’t read a whole book in Arabic I’d rather get it’s English equivalent and I blame my teachers who did not teach us well. I agree with many things Franck raises some of course I feel are slightly over the top but he shocks to get our attention and whether or not these are true facts is another thing but more or less it sounds familiar. Thanks for always sharing and keeping up the lovely blog well done.

     
  9. Terri

    June 25, 2012 at 11:07 pm

    Cheers, I just stopped by to visit your blog and thought I’d say thanks for making linguistics and language talk simple for us idiots!

     
  10. Giada

    June 26, 2012 at 9:11 am

    First off I want to say terrific blog! As a linguistics student I have benefited greatly from not just how you treat Arabic but how you view and think about language as a whole. Thank you for allowing us to learn along with you and I love the fact that you never claim to have all the answers but you persistently question and discuss….best wishes

     
    • FFSS

      July 4, 2012 at 3:04 pm

      Thank you Giada that’s very kind of you..I am so glad you feel that you have benefited from the blog…good luck

       
  11. Murphy

    April 10, 2013 at 4:08 am

    Some nice points put here though I have to agree with you the author is slightly out of touch when it comes to Arabic. There are Arabic speakers and his experience I am afraid is an imperialist one.Thank you for putting this for us to read even though you don’t agree with everything he is saying. Sometimes it’s good to put out all points of view when dealing with a controversial issue like this one. Good luck

     
    • FatmaS

      April 14, 2013 at 2:38 pm

      Thanks for the comments Murphy, of course we must look at all side of the argument even the ridiculous simplistic ones or the very controversial ones. Thanks for reading.

       
  12. Rosina Hassoun

    November 15, 2013 at 9:19 pm

    Another flaw here seems to be the fact that so many people in the Arab world do read the Quran. Quranic Arabic is not MSA, but Quranic Arabic is being taught all over the region and the world in religious schools. Before we pronounce written Arabic dead, perhaps we should watch some of these Quranic recitation contests that are so popular around the region. But I also don’t deny that when I travel to the Gulf, the major language I hear and see is English. Nevertheless, I must concur with your criticism of this article, in that the experience of linguistic colonialism is very different in Lebanon and North Africa, nice!

     

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